Yanagisawa Annotated Timeline

There are at least a dozen Yanagisawa timelines and histories out on the Internet. I decided to try to reconcile them all and add stuff they were missing. One definite thing I can say is that Yanagisawa is a pretty busy manufacturer.


1893-94:
The history of woodwind manufacturing in Japan had its origins in 1894 when Tokutaro Yanagisawa began repairing imported woodwinds for military band members. Within that wartime setting, Tokutaro’s repair shop soon evolved into an instrument factory — the first to build woodwind instruments on Japanese soil. (From The Official Yanagisawa Website.)

Sources that put this at 1893, not 1894:
The RiojaSax Blog
The Sina Blog
MyMusicTalkSax
Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia)

===============

1896:
Yanagisawa Wind Instruments Co., Ltd. established. (From The Official Yanagisawa Website.)

===============

1921:
The Egawa Rappa factory was established in 1921 to make Signal Trumpets cornets and trumpets under the name Nikkan, by Mr. Tokutaro Yaganisawa, the first technician to make and repair brass instruments in Japan. (From The RiojaSax Blog.)

Other corroborating sources:
MyMusicTalkSax
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia)

================

1951:
Tokutaro’s son Takanobu followed in his father’s footsteps, choosing to pursue a career in the craft of instrument-making, and built his first prototype saxophone in 1951. (From The Official Yanagisawa Website.)

================

1954:
The first T-3, silver plated and engraved with the design of a castle, was bought by an American soldier at the Komaki store in Tokyo. (From The RiojaSax Blog.)

The earliest T-3 I have pictures of is from 1961.

Other corroborating sources:
The Sina Blog (well, the date, at least)
MyMusicTalkSax
Yanagisawa Saxophone on Facebook
Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article

================

1955:
Yanagisawa, under the direction of Mr. Takanobu Yanagisawa, decided to concentrate on saxophone production, and sold the Nikkan factory. Nikkan eventually became better known as YAMAHA. (From The RiojaSax Blog.)

Other corroborating sources:
MyMusicTalkSax
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia)

================

1956:
The A-3 alto is introduced in December, 1956. (From The RiojaSax Blog.)

The earliest A-3 I have pictures of is from 1959.

Other corroborating sources for the “1956” date:
MyMusicTalkSax
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia)
Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article
The SAXess! Blog
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia)
Purple-Cat.info
The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page

================

1961:
Yanagisawa Wind Instruments Co., Ltd. is incorporated. (From The Official Yanagisawa Website.)

================

1957-1965:
For the next [few years] the company to produce alto and tenor saxophones but did not produce any new models. However, as the company motto “Yanagisawa pursues technology” suggests they were by no means dormant. The company, endeavouring to become a saxophone specialist, remodelled the existing 2 saxophones and plans were on the drawing board to produce a full range of saxophones for the domestic market.

(This is from the Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article. Source says “For the next ten years,” but mentions the introduction of the A-5 in 1965, so the article is referring obviously referring to the T-3, not the A-3.)

================

1965:
In June 1965 the remodelled alto was released as the A-5. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.)

The earliest A-5 I have pictures of is from 1967.

Other corroborating sources:
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia)
The RiojaSax Blog
The Sina Blog

Yani’s official website just gives a range of dates for the introduction of the A-3, A-5, T-5 and B-6 of “1956 – 1966.” (The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page.)

==================

1966:
The T-5 is introduced in February. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.)

The earliest T-5 I have pictures of is from 1971.

Other corroborating sources for the 1966 year:
The RiojaSax Blog
The Sina Blog
The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page just gives a range of dates for the introduction of the A-3, A-5, T-5 and B-6 of “1956 – 1966.”

==================

1966:
The A-4 and T-4 are released in April and/or May. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.)

The earliest A-4 I have pictures of is from 1970.
The earliest T-4 I have pictures of is from 1970.

Other corroborating sources for the 1966 year:
The RiojaSax Blog
The Sina Blog
The SAXess! Blog says May is the intro month for the A-4.
The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page just gives a range of dates for the introduction of the A-3, A-5, T-5 and B-6 of “1956 – 1966.”

==================

1967:
March 1967 saw the introduction of the first baritone made in Japan. The B-6 attracted a great deal of attention and acclaim. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.)

The earliest B-6 I have pictures of is from 1970.

Other corroborating sources for the March 1967 date:
The RiojaSax Blog

Dissenting opinions:
The Sina Blog says 1968
Yanagisawa Saxophone on Facebook says 1966
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia) says 1966
The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page just gives a range of dates for the introduction of the A-3, A-5, T-5 and B-6 of “1956 – 1966.”

==================

1968-9:
The S-6 soprano, the first soprano made in Japan, is released. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.)

The earliest S-6 I have pictures of is from 1974.

Opinions:
The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page says 1968
The RiojaSax Blog says September 1968
The Sina Blog says 1968
MyMusicTalkSax says 1968
Yanagisawa Saxophone on Facebook says 1968
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia) says 1968
Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article says March 1969

==================

1968:
The SN-600 sopranino model with high-E key is finished and released.

Yanagisawa displays prototypes of a new professional line integrating innovative structural design enhancements that highlight its commitment to producing flexible saxophones for a wide range of musical styles. (The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page.)

Opinions:
The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page says 1968.
The RiojaSax Blog says December 1968.
MyMusicTalkSax says 1968.
Yanagisawa Saxophone on Facebook says 1968.
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia) says 1968.

==================

1968-70:
An A-4 low A alto prototype is produced. (The SAXess! Blog.)

There are no other websites I know of with information on the low A A-4 variant, but the Saxess blog does have a picture of it. I tend to doubt the A-4 low A horns were put into production.

==================

1968-70:
The company continued their policy of upgrading and superseded the A-[5] by bringing out the A-6 alto saxophone in August 1970. By this time, the Yanagisawa Company had proved to themselves to be the leading innovators of saxophones on their domestic market, but the world stage was still waiting. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.)

Oddly, I have pics of only one A-6, which is undated. I’ve seen more of these horns, but the pics available were actually worse than the ones I present here. If you have pics of an A-6 that you’d like to send me, drop me an e-mail!

Opinions:
The RiojaSax Blog says late 1969.
The Sina Blog says 1968.
MyMusicTalkSax says 1970.
The SAXess! Blog says August 1970.
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia) says 1970.

==================

1972:
In February 1972, Yanagisawa developed their first solid silver alto saxophone, (the A-7.

Again, this was not a production horn. Just a prototype.

Opinions:
(Note these opinions tend to specify “sterling body and neck.” However, if the A-7 is the “7” in 9937, as the Saxess blog states, above, you’re talking about a full sterling silver horn. Yanagisawa DOES distinguish between the 9930, which has a sterling body and neck, and the 9937, which is all sterling silver.)

The RiojaSax Blog says early 1970s.
MyMusicTalkSax says 1972.
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia) says 1972.

==================

1972:
In June 1972, they released the SN-6, the world’s first sopranino saxophone with an altissimo F# key. This sopranino is owned by Sonny Rollins. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article; corrections added)

This little horn was difficult to find out about. The SN-600 with a range to altissimo E was released in 1968. I’m relatively sure that the keyed range is the only difference.

Opinions:
The RiojaSax Blog says June 1972.
The Sina Blog mentions the F# (the only article that does!) and says 1972.
MyMusicTalkSax says 1972.
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia) says 1972.

==================

1973:
With the saxophone line fulfilled, the company gained the fully fledged reputation of being the saxophone specialist manufacturer to accommodate all saxophone artists. Saxophonists, whatever their ability and whatever make of saxophone, were always welcome at the Yanagisawa factory to have their instrument looked at, overhauled or customised at very little or no charge. Many of the top Japanese saxophonists as well as international touring musicians called at the factory with their instruments. The skilled technicians listened very carefully to their points of view. A common complaint was of the mediocrity of commercially available mouthpieces. Always obliging in their quest to satisfy the needs of musicians the challenge was inviting.

In December 1973 the Yanagisawa Company started production of their hand-made metal and hard rubber mouthpieces. These mouthpieces are held in high acclaim by musicians all over the world and the demand is increasing every year. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.)

Opinions:
The RiojaSax Blog says December 1973.
MyMusicTalkSax says 1973.
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia) says 1973.

==================

Mid-to-Late 1970s:
Yanagisawa produced the A-2 “beginner” horn. A reduced-keywork and keyed range alto saxophone which was very similar to the Buescher Academy line.

The earliest A-2 I have pictures of is from 1975.

I’ve seen several of these horns, but I’ve only seen them documented on the The SAXess! Blog.

==================

1977:
At a 1977 music instrument fair, Yanagisawa announces a new line of soprano, alto, and tenor models epitomizing the “Yanagisawa Technology” philosophy, thus completing a full lineup of 15 models in five saxophone categories, from sopranino to baritone. [This would be the 800 Series.]

Echoing its motto for a wind instrument manufacturing process that “starts in the hands, passes through machines, and ends back in the hands,” Yanagisawa enlists an integrated approach, with the manufacture of every single part combining the skills of expert craftsmen with modern precision machinery. Yanagisawa saxophones have earned strong acclaim worldwide and are today exported to major markets in North, Central, and South America as well as Australia and Europe. (The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page.)

Up to this period the Yanagisawa Company had been manufacturing instruments for other well known saxophone companies who had their names engraved on them. Examples of this were the Selmer Pennsylvania, Conn Continental and saxophones under the Martin brand name. To this day I am still reminded by musicians of the similarities to the older saxophones. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.)

The earliest A-800 I have pictures of is this one, from 1980.
The earliest T-800 I have pictures of is this one, from 1981.

See below articles for other mentions of the 800 and 880 release dates. Most just give a range of 1978-85.

==================

1978:
In July 1978 Yanagisawa proudly began engraved their own name on the bell with their S-800 soprano. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article; reworded a bit)

The earliest S-800 I have pictures of is from 1982.

Opinions:
The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page says 1978-85 for the intro of the 800 and 880 Series.
The RiojaSax Blog says July 1978 for the introduction of the 800 Series.
MyMusicTalkSax says 1978 for the introduction of the 880 Series.
Yanagisawa Saxophone on Facebook says 1978-85 for the intro of the 800 and 880 Series.
The SAXess! Blog says July 1978 for the introduction of the A-800 and A-80 (Asian-market A-800).
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia) says 1978 for the introduction of the 880 Series.
See above articles for other mentions of the 800 and 880 release dates. Most just give a range of 1978-85.

The Sina Blog has this little gem, which I’m translating and transliterating:

Yanagisawa started out making generic Selmer copies. In the 1980s, they became more confident and gradually came out of the shadow of the French model saxophone. The keywork has Yanagisawa’s own ideas added, especially in the underslung octave key mechanism and the G#/C#/B/Bb table keys of the 880.

My opinion is that Yanagisawa did roll in some of their own ideas about ergonomics, but the 880, from everything I can see, is probably the best Selmer Mark VI copy out there. The later 900 Series horns have more of a Selmer Super 80 look.

==================

1979:
In 1979 [Yanagisawa] finally succeeded in making their first curved soprano, [the SC-800], one of the most difficult instruments to make, through Yanagisawa’s well seasoned technology. The academic people and famed artist of both Japan and overseas, who had advised on its making, highly appraised the instrument. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.)

The earliest SC-800 I have pictures of is from 1980.

Opinions:
The RiojaSax Blog says May 1979.
MyMusicTalkSax says 1978.
Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia) says 1978.
See above articles for other mentions of the 800 and 880 release dates. Most just give a range of 1978-85

==================

1980:
The whole range was upgraded in 1980 with the introduction of the superior series 880 models and the improved series 500 altos and tenors. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.)

The earliest A-880 I have pictures of is from 1981.
The earliest T-880 I have pictures of is from 1981.
The earliest A-500 I have pictures of is from 1981.
The earliest T-500 I have pictures of is from 1983.

It’s probable that the B-800 (both low A and low Bb variants) and SN-800 were released around 1980, giver or take a year or two. I don’t have enough pictorial evidence to support this, yet.

Opinions:
The RiojaSax Blog says 1982. Incorrect date, based on pictorial evidence.
The SAXess! Blog says 1980 for the introduction of the 880, 80, 50, and 500 Series.
See above articles for other mentions of the 800 and 880 release dates. Most just give a range of 1978-85.

==================

1980:
Yanagisawa released 50 A-600 horns and probably that many tenors. These horns are identical to the A-6, except that they have a German Silver “G key bar” (quoting from a Yanagisawa letter), rather than brass.

==================

1982:
Yanagisawa begins making sterling silver necks and they’re available as optional accessories. (From The Sina Blog.)

==================

1985:
Yanagisawa launches the S-880 soprano, their first soprano with a removable neck. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.)

The earliest S-880 I have pictures of is from 1985.

I think it’s probable that the SC-880 and B-880 (both low A and low Bb variants) were also released in 1985. I don’t have enough pictorial evidence to support this, yet.

Opinions:
The RiojaSax Blog says 1985.
The Sina Blog says 1985.
MyMusicTalkSax says 1985.
See above articles for other mentions of the 800 and 880 release dates. Most just give a range of 1978-85.

==================

1985:
Takanobu Yanagisawa is appointed chairman of the Tokyo Musical Instrument Manufacturers Association (From MyMusicTalkSax.)

==================

1985:
Yanagisawa Germany sales launched. (Mike Duchstein – Saxophon-Service.)

==================

1988:
The sterling silver series of Yanagisawa horns are introduced:the 8830 all-sterling silver horns and the 8833 sterling silver bell with optional sterling silver neck. (baike.baidu.com.)

I’m not 100% sure that all pitches had 8830 or 8833 variants available. That’s mainly because I haven’t seen too many of these horns. I’ve only seen 8830 straight sopranos, but I’ve seen 8833 sopranos and altos.

Opinions:
The RiojaSax Blog says 1988.
Mike Duchstein – Saxophon-Service” target=”_blank”>Mike Duchstein – Saxophon-Service says 1988.

==================

1990-2:
The popularity and acceptance of Yanagisawa as a major name in quality saxophone production during this period gave the company more confidence to strive forward for their goal of perfection. With the introduction of the -900 and -990 series in baritone and soprano saxophones, the quest was on to prove to the world that another major innovation was due. The S-990 detachable neck soprano was the worlds first saxophone to have a high G key.

The success achieved here eventually saw the introduction of the -900 and -990 series alto and tenor saxophones in September 1992. Now the sceptics, who claimed that only the baritones and sopranos were very good, started taking the altos and tenors very seriously indeed. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.)

While I don’t currently have many 900/990 pictures, I can say that the latest 800/880 pictures I have are from 1991. That would imply that a 1990 release year is inaccurate.

Opinions:
The RiojaSax Blog says the S-900/990 were released in January 1990, with the B-900/990 [following] “closely after.”
The alto and tenor were released in October 1990.
The Sina Blog says 1991.
MyMusicTalkSax says 1990.
Yanagisawa Saxophone on Facebook says 1990.
baike.baidu.com says 1991.
The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page says 1990.

==================

1992-5:
The B-9930 silver neck and body baritone was launched onto the market in January 1992, a time when a major upgrade was on the horizon. (From The RiojaSax Blog.)

All of the 9030 and 9930 horns I’ve seen were produced post 1996. However, the 900μ and 990μ were introduced around 1993-4, so I think 1993 is probably a more realistic year.

Note that Yanagisawa calls the 9930 the “Silver Sonic” model. (The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page.)

Opinions:
The Sina Blog says the entire 9930 series was released in 1993.
MyMusicTalkSax says the entire 9930 series was released in 1995.
The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page says the entire 9930 series was released by 1995.
baike.baidu.com says 1993.

==================

1992:
Takanobu Yanagisawa becomes chairman of the Nippon Musical Instrument Manufacturers Association. (From MyMusicTalkSax.)

==================

1994:
Takanobu Yanagisawa assumed the position of chairman of Yanagisawa Wind Instruments, appointing his son Nobushige Yanagisawa, company president. (From MyMusicTalkSax.)

==================

1994-5:
Now the sceptics, who claimed that only the baritones and sopranos were very good, started taking the altos and tenors very seriously indeed. During the reign of the 900 series, further improvements were quietly taking place (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.) This “transitional” Series from the 900/990 to the 901/991 was the 900μ and 990μ alto and tenor.

The latest 900/990 series horns I have pictures of — sans sopraninos, sopranos and baris — are from 1994. That makes me believe that 1995 is probably the correct introduction year.

Opinions:
The Sina Blog says the entire 900μ and 990μ series was released in February 1992.
Yanagisawa Saxophone on Facebook says that the 900μ and 990μ series was released by 1995.
The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page says that the 900μ and 990μ series was released by 1995.

==================

1994:
This is the first year I’ve seen Yanagisawa use a colored lacquer, the 901BL black lacquer horns.

==================

1995:
Yanagisawa finally launched a silver bell in the midrange tenor, now people can finally have a completely manufactured by Silver Sax (i.e. 9935 series, plus a brass tube body and Silver bell 9933 series). (From The Sina Blog.)

I’ve actually not seen another reference to the actual release date of the 9932, 9933, or 9935 sterling silver horns. I definitely know of 9933s from 1996, though.

==================

1997/8:
Yanagisawa switches production to the 901/991.

[The 901 and 991] went through the most major of any upgrade on any manufactured saxophone today. A complete re-tooling was carried out to facilitate the re-positioning of the tone holes and taper for the ultimate in pitch and action.

When talking to anybody from the Yanagisawa Company as to what they think is the most important priority in a saxophone, the answer is always “The sound”. When you talk to most saxophonists and you ask them the same question the answer again is “The sound”. So many musicians play on very old saxophones because they have “that sound”. Unfortunately, many musicians have to compensate for the inadequacies of the tuning and older actions of these saxophones in order to get “that sound”. That is the sound that we love to hear on some of our favourite albums. (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.)

The last 900μ and 990μ altos and tenors I have pics of are from 1997 and the earliest 901/991 horns are from 1997/8.

Most other sources say that the 901, 991 and 992 were released together in 1995, e.g. MyMusicTalkSax, which does mesh with the introduction of the 901BL horns.

Considering that the 902/992 would logically be released after the horns they’re modelled on, I think 1995 is an incorrect date.

==================

1998:
There are so many theories as to why brass today should be so different to brass of yesterday, but really no one knows. Not accepting the general consensus that it could not be done, Yanagisawa began experimenting with different metals and alloys to achieve a sound close to the sound of the older saxophones. Having narrowed the field down to bronze, they built prototypes with different grades of bronze before deciding on which one would be the most acceptable sound. This was the birth of the -992 series. The -992 series, with its comfortable fast action, precision tuning and “that sound”, was launched in November 1998 (Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article.)

Opinions:
The RiojaSax Blog says that the 992 was released in 1998.
MyMusicTalkSax says that the 992 was released in 1995.

==================

1999:
Takanobu Yanagisawa passed away April 23rd 1999 leaving the company under his son’s, Nobushige Yanagisawa’s, capable direction. (From MyMusicTalkSax.)

==================

1998:
Yanagisawa releases some 901 Special horns. I think the only difference between the Special and a regular 901 is that the thumbrests are plastic on the Special.

==================

1999-2002:
The range was supplemented [in 2000] with the 902 series. The S-902 Bronze Soprano was introduced as the first bronze version of the intermediate 901 series. Alto, Tenor and Baritone followed in 2001. the dark sound coupled with fast, easy response have made these saxophones the choice of many advanced players. (From The RiojaSax Blog.)

The earliest S-902 I have pictures from is dated 2000.
The earliest A-902 I have pictures from is dated 2000.
The earliest T-902 I have pictures from is dated 2004.

Opinions:
The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page says 2002 for the A-902 and 2003 for the T-902.
MyMusicTalkSax says 1999.
Barnes & Mullins Archive.org Article says 2000 for the soprano and January 2001 for the alto, tenor, and baritone.
Yanagisawa Saxophone on Facebook says 2002.

==================

1999-2000:
Sandwiched between the launch of the Bronze series, in 1999 the A-9937 Alto arrived as the first all silver saxophone. This was closely followed by the T-9937 Tenor. (From The RiojaSax Blog.)

The earliest A-9937 I have pictures of is from 1999.

Opinions:
Yanagisawa Saxophone on Facebook says 1999 for the alto and 2000 for the tenor.
The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page says 1999 for the alto and 2000 for the tenor.

==================

Approximately 2000:
Yanagisawa releases the curved-neck S-981 soprano and SN-981 straight-neck sopranino.

The 981s were and are sold mostly in Europe and Asia and seem to be still available, today.
The earliest S-981 I have pictures of is from 2000.

==================

2000:
A newly-designed bronze thumbhook and thumbrest are introduced. (From Eltham Woodwind & Brass (Yani Australia).)

This “innovation” is literally translated as “The Wizard of Sam” or as “Samfukku” on some Japanese to English websites. Just in case you see the phrase again. The idea behind this is to increase resonance.

==================

2000:
Yanagisawa puts the finishing touches on its top baritone model, the B-9930BSB (The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page.)

Quoting from Yani’s website, the B-9930 BSB is a clear-lacquer & silver-plated finish. The neck, upper bow, and body are sterling silver with a clear lacquer finish. The lower bow and bell are bronze, with a silver plated finish. It even has a floor peg.

There have been a couple of 9930 BSB-Z limited horns available, as well. I’ve seen the alto and tenor variants.

==================

2000:
Yanagisawa launches the bronze-bodied 992gp series with gold-plate finish. (The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page.)

The oldest 992gp altos I have pictures of are from 2001.

Opinions:
Yanagisawa Saxophone on Facebook confirms 2000

==================

Approximately 2000:
Yanagisawa releases the 901II models. These are primarily sold in Asia and Europe.

==================

Approximately 2000:
Yanagisawa releases horns with VG (“velour gold”) matte lacquer.

==================

2001:
The bronze 992PGP series debuts with new pink-gold plated models (The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page.)

The 992PGP isn’t that common. The oldest one I have pictures of is only from 2009, so I can’t independently confirm the date.

Opinions:
Yanagisawa Saxophone on Facebook confirms 2001.
The RiojaSax Blog says 2004.

==================

2002:
The 9937PGP series is born, rounding out the all-sterling lineup with pink-gold plated models. (The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page.)

Opinions:
Yanagisawa Saxophone on Facebook confirms 2002.

==================

2004:
The SC-991 and SC-992 curved soprano models are announced. (The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page.)

==================

2006:
Yanagisawa builds the A-9914, the world’s first alto saxophone with neck, body, bow, and bell crafted entirely in 14K gold. Reference prototypes are exhibited at Musikmesse 2006, globally showcasing the advanced technology of the Yanagisawa brand. (The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page.)

==================

2008:
The SC-9937 curved soprano sax with all-sterling neck, body, bow, and bell is unveiled. Yanagisawa continues to pursue new innovations in its quest for the ultimate saxophone. (The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page.)

==================

2013:
The WO series alto is launched. (The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page)

==================

2015:
The WO series tenor is launched. (The Official Yanagisawa Website – Technology Page)

Pete Hales Written by: